Huddle Tip of the Day – Value Progression of Inserts

One of the things I have really liked about huddle over the past few months is that award payouts have been increased exponentially. Not only has it added value to the cards that would normally be without the same level of worth, but it adds wealth to the economy. That is a good thing all around. That doesnt mean that people really understand the trading environment for any reward based mission card, so I want to break it down.

Basically, many people have no idea when the best time to trade for or get rid of a card they want to trade, so here is how I operate.

Release – Day 1

Whether its a sig or a new set card, release will be one of the best times to trade a card, especially if you are one of the only people to own the card at first. There will be set chasers and reward chasers that want your pulled insert, and you should seriously consider giving it up to them if you have no intention of keeping the card. Even if you do want to eventually keep the card long term, its better to wait until day 8 and beyond to pick it back up dirt cheap.

Day 2

When its part of a set, this is where things can get very complicated. If its a one card release, by this time more people have the card, and the value starts to decrease over release. Once the card gets into circulation, more copies are available to meet the demand, so value drops. In a set card, likely another one (or two) will hit the sheet, and the previously released card will be not as valuable. Supply on set cards will also dictate value.

Day 3

At this point, most of the hardcore set collectors or higher end chasers will have their card, which will leave the more “Huddle Poor” users left to fend for the remaining copies. Although this creates value in itself, they wont have the firepower to trade that the “Huddle Rich” users have. This means they will want to haggle more, and you wont get overpaid as much as you did had you traded day one. If the card is still very low count, the value could remain in tact, but the majority of pack pulled cards dont follow this method. Im talking cards that are 50 and below (a la Murray sig).

Day 4

Again, many of the users who were chasing have their copies, but through opening packs, may have stumbled across extra copies of other cards, or want dupes for alternate accounts. The value will start to climb again, as these users look to complete a second or even third set. They wont pay as much this time around, but any time the richer users want a card, value goes up.

Days 5 and 6

At this point, the entire user base becomes painfully aware of the cards’ pending award and everyone starts to scramble. The more poor users may be willing to overpay with some of their best cards because they want the award that badly.

Day 7 – Payout

This is where two things start to happen. Everyone who has a shot at the award is looking to get their ducks in a row, and some are going to still be chasing their cards. Because so many people are now scrounging, the value creeps back up to where it was about release time. This is also scam ridden territory, where people are looking to borrow the cards for the awards, or just trying to trade theirs away AFTER the payout for the same price, so be wary.

Day 8 and After Payout

If you are looking to pick up the card or set for long term collecting goals, this is the time to do so. Cards with a season long chase will still carry more value than set pieces that have no chase, so this is a great opportunity to pad your collection. Its crazy how much value is lost after payout on cards above a 100 card count, but it was that way in Bunt too. In fact, this model can easily be applied there.

Here is a visual chart if you dont want to read everything.

Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 8.37.35 AM

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Gameplay Tips and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s